Boise, Idaho
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Update by user Jul 07, 2013

My dog almost died after her dental cleaning. I let Banfield know that I had to take her to a different vet who was able to save her after 3 visits with antibiotics and steroids.

Bandfield had not responded at all except to continue to Bill me and my daughter for our 3 different Wellness plans. We can't afford to pay them and be able to pay other vets to fix their mistakes. We won't take any pets back to them because we care about them too much to gamble with their lives.

As far as Dr. Ames goes, (the doctor who did the dental) I haven't heard a word on ANYTHING as to whether or not they have even talked to her.

Original review posted by user May 12, 2013

I took my Aussie in for a scheduled dental cleaning in Boise on May 11, 2013, picked her up at 5:45 after being told she was doing good, drove back home (1.5 hrs away). Became concerned when she wouldn't stop pacing and panting with a hot, dry nose. Called West Vet emergency (in Boise) who told me that anxiety was normal when dogs are recovering from anesthesia. After doing research on my computer regarding the anesthesia used on my dog, I found that Australian Shepherds are reported by as much as 50% to have a mutant gene called MDR1 that cannot break down the exact medications given to my Aussie.

?Acepromazine (tranquilizer and pre-anesthetic agent). In dogs with the MDR1 mutation, acepromazine tends to cause more profound and prolonged sedation. We recommend reducing the dose by 25% in dogs heterozygous for the MDR1 mutation (mutant/normal) and by 30-50% in dogs homozygous for the MDR1 mutation (mutant/mutant).

?Butorphanol (analgesic and pre-anesthetic agent). Similar to acepromazine, butorphanol tends to cause more profound and prolonged sedation in dogs with the MDR1 mutation.We recommend reducing the dose by 25% in dogs heterozygous for the MDR1 mutation (mutant/normal) and by 30-50% in dogs homozygous for the MDR1 mutation (mutant/mutant).

Dr. Ames also saw my dog. I wasn't happy with her during the post consult when she was upset with me for not wanting to try Science Diet. I didn't want to because it has a lot of stuff that my dog has shown me she is allergic to. Dr. Ames kept arguing the case for Science Diet in spite of what I told her.

Dr. Ames, Banfield and My Wellness Plan that helps you get inexpensive dentals has so far cost me an additional 236.00 and counting. My dog is not out of the woods yet. She's still panting and pacing after throwing up bile. She is being monitored by a local vet. After paying him the money for an emergency, Banfield's fee for two Wellness Plans I have with them came out of my bank account causing an overdraft. Now for Mother's Day, I have -$62.00 in my account with no money coming in for two more weeks plus more vet bills and medication with the local vet who is trying to help me and my Aussie girl. This vet said that he doesn't use Acepromazine anymore because there are other meds that are newer and work better. Banfield and Dr. Ames are you so incompetent to not even consider basic life saving information?

Product or Service Mentioned: Banfield Pet Hospital Wellness Plan.

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Anonymous
#1221883

Aussies CAN be more sensitive, but before you go jumping to conclusions and slandering a Vet (by name too, not OK unless you have proof - you can end up getting in legal trouble for that) you really need to be sure you have all the right info.

1. Does YOUR particular pet have this gene defect (is confirmed with special bloodwork, sent to an outside laboratory, it will not show up on a regular CBC/Chem).

If she does not then all this is a moot point & useless guesswork.

2. Do you know what dose they used? I would suggest that before you make the very serious accusation of a licensed medical professional overdosing your pet that you get a hold of the records and verify if this was done?

3.

Also be aware that even a perfectly healthy pet, with no genetic defects at all can have an adverse reaction to anesthesia. Just like people can. No medications are 100% risk free, even something as benign as aspirin can be really dangerous to the wrong individual.

That is why you sign a surgical consent form before any procedures - the risks are listed on there & you really should read it & ask questions before the procedure if you have concerns.

I hope she is feeling better soon, but please be careful not to just look for a scapegoat when nothing may have been done wrong, that is not a fair thing to do.

Anonymous
#1158672

Do you even know how much acepromazine and butorphanol your dog actually got on that day? And since you seem to know so much about it you know the concentration of these drugs?

How do you know that they did not give half or 25% less than the recommended dose? Surely it has nothing to do with you putting your dog in a hot car and driving over an hour away

Anonymous
#1221453
@Anonymous

Why are you being so defensive and jumping down my throat? To answer your question: Well, Umm, maybe you know I know because I had to take her to another vet so she wouldn't die... And oh, maybe that vet was smarter than you were when you asked such dumb questions.