Raleigh, North Carolina
6 comments

Banfield tried to charge us $1200.00 to treat a dog we rescued which tested positive for Heartworms. I found two other local veteranarians that would do treatment for between $120-$200. Banfield didn't have anything to say other than the $1200 is their cost.

Banfield tries to get you to run all types of tests. The dog we rescued was only one year old and weighed less than 10 pounds. We ended up going to on of the other local vets. It did cost an additional $30.00 to have some tests run, but not an additional $1000.00.

We stopped going to Banfield all together. Even with our pets that had Wellness plans there. We have saved money just by going elsewhere vs. the Wellness plans which we were unable to cancel.

Product or Service Mentioned: Banfield Pet Hospital Wellness Plan.

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Anonymous
#1098582

Heartworm is a potentially fatal condition - this is not something to take the 'cheap' treatment option with or you risk your dogs life.

To correctly, in accordance with high medical standards & guidelines, work-up and treat this condition you are looking at needing multiple x-rays, hospitalized rest, a series of injections and medications, and pre/follow-up bloodwork. That being said, $1200 is at the high end of the cost range, so if you called some reputable local practices you could probably do better, BUT MAKE SURE THEY ARE FOLLOWING THE CORRECT TREATMENT GUIDELINES, because it sounds impossible to do so for ~$200 - they are probably just giving the bare minimum.....which is risky!

Anonymous
#1096233

We were just quoted $1600-$2000 by Banfield for heartworm treatment in our 9 year old black lab.

Anonymous
#52434

Well, you get what you pay for!

It sounds like they were suggesting a treatment that was in line with the American Heartworm Society's recommendations.

Heartworm treatment at our hospital ranges from $500-800+ usually for a 36 hour hospital stay. This is for an uncomplicated case, as in the pet is not showing any signs of illness or distress. It can get more expensive if the pet is ill or develops problems from the treatment itself.

Anonymous
#48941

Yes, banfield's heartworm treatments are high. Because they include all of the quality of care involved to ensure that the treatment does not kill your dog. The treatment is very dangerous and Banfield strives to be as successful as they can. Working at other private clinics, I have seen about 50% of the Heartworm dogs die. Why? because we did the "cheap" treatment. Slam them with the meds, keep them quiet, hope for the best.

But banfield is not like that. They do x-rays to ensure the heart is doing well, they do an ecg to be sure the heart is working properly and not being damaged. they do bloodwork multiple times to ensure the meds and worms are not destorying other areas. And overall, they ensure a higher recovery rate than what I've seen personally. I've seen many more successful heartworm treatments through banfield than in 10 years in private practice doing the "cheap" way. I'll never go back to the cheap heartworm treatment again with my own pets. Not after seeing what I've seen now.

You were given a quote. Sorry you did not agree with it. It is your right to turn to another. Good luck.

Anonymous
#48833

I guess you didn't want a real check up and treatment, you wanted the a la carte treatment with a pay as we find things wrong with your pooch.

You didn't pay Banfields quote which was your option to do, and you left banfield, so why do you come here and cry about it.

If you would have got a wrong quote and it cost more, then you have a complaint

I am a VERY happy Banfield customer, I would not go to another vet.

Enjoy your $40.00 office visits with your new vet, lets hope your new addition does not need to go to the vet more than once a year.

Anonymous
#48218

Banfield's quote likely included all sorts of pre-treatment screening - general labwork to identify any underlying problems that would interfere with heartworm treatment, chest x-rays and ECG to stage the disease present, and appropriate follow-up labwork, microfilaricide treatment, etc. The drug used to kill adult heartworms (a positive heartworm test is based on the presence of antigen secreted by adult female worms) is Immiticide, a very expensive intramuscular injection, but other medications (i.e., ivermectin) are used to kill microfilaria (immature worms).

The quote also likely included charges for hospitalization and nursing care, as it's recommended during certain phases of treatment. Bottom line, Banfield's quote was for the "Cadillac" or "textbook" approach to treating heartworm disease in the safest and most thorough manner possible. The few hundred dollars you were quoted elsewhere likely included the bare minimum - drugs only, with little additional diagnostic or follow-up labwork.

Which is fine, if that's the way you elect to have your animal treated or if it's all you can do in terms of financial resources. But comparing the two quotes without taking those variable into account is like comparing apples to oranges.